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WELLNESS

DOG TREAT RECIPE: KALE SQUASH SURPRISE

Pawsh-dog-treat-recipe-squash-surpriseWith Halloween just around the corner, it’s time to start brainstorming some frightful and delightful ways to have a spooky good time! So we’ve cooked up a delectable dog treat recipe that looks very green and ghoulish!

What You Need:
— a muffin tin and muffin cups
— 1 cup diced butternut squash
— 1/2 cup of finely chopped kale
— 1 egg
— 1/4 cup whole wheat flour (optional — this is to help bind the mixture so it bakes more easily)

Directions:
1. In a sturdy blender mix all of the ingredients until you achieve a thick consistency.
2. Pour mixture evenly into muffin tin. (I personally like using muffin tins when baking for Rory because it cuts down on mess and cleanup).
3. If you’re leaving these out at a party, top each muffin treat with a small piece of bright orange squash.
4. Bake in over at 350 for 15 minutes.
5. Remove, allow to cool and serve! TIP: To make these tasty morsels last longer, cut into small pieces before treating your pup!
Pawsh-dog-treat-recipe-squash-surprise-2The nutritional breakdown:
KALE is packed with natural anti-oxidants and anti-inflammatories which helps to alleviate joint pain and stress from daily, repetitive movements. It is also loaded with beneficial vitamins that are sometimes missing from a strictly kibble-based diet, such as vitamin C, K, beta carotene and magnesium. Plus it is low-cal!

SQUASH is colourful, smells wonderful while it is baking and is bursting with provitamin A which helps keep your furry friends’ diet balanced.

EGGS are an excellent source of protein and help to keep a dog’s dog luscious and healthy. They also provide essential minerals.

In conclusion:
These treats are a healthy snack for dogs of all shapes and sizes. Plus their green nature is perfect for this ‘spooktacular’ time of year. Serve at your dog-friendly Halloween party and call them something like ‘Brain Cakes’ or ‘Booger Bites’ to really get into the festive mindset.

PAWSH PERKS: Apple-yogurt freezies for dogs.

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DOG HEALTH: DOG EAR INFECTIONS

pawsh-magazine-dog-ear-infection-1 Everybody knows that dogs have incredible hearing, but did you know that many breeds and mixes, of all shapes and sizes, are prone to ear infections.

Unlike a human ear canal, a dog’s is rather L-shaped, which means waxy build-up can more easily occur in the little elbow of that ‘L’ shape. Wax build-up then leads to bacteria and even fungus development which can become very serious and uncomfortable.

Today we’re chatting about ear-care basics; how to identify an ear infection, how to prevent it and how to treat it if need be.

4 signs your dog might have an ear infection
pawsh-magazine-dog-ear-infection-61. Unusual smell
A canine ear infection typically comes with a rather pungent and noticeable smell. If you notice such an unpleasant smell when you hover above your dog’s head or flip your dog’s ears, take your pupster to your vet for a complete check up.

2. Shaking
As you can imagine, having an ear infection is very uncomfortable and a dog will do whatever it can to try and relieve some of that discomfort. Excessive shaking of the head is a common symptom of an ear infection, so be sure to watch for this behaviour.

3. Scratching
Similar to shaking of the head, scratching is another way for a dog to try and make itself feel better. A dog may try to scratch around or by its ear to the point of breaking the skin, or even rub the side of its head along the ground in an effort to stop the irritation.

4. Inflammation
Perhaps the best indication of an ear infection, however, is redness, swelling or visible irritation around the ear or inside the ear. To check for this simple flip your dog’s ear – gently of course, as they are probably sensitive – and observe. Do not touch the redness or irritation as that will most likely be painful for your dog.

How to treat a dog ear infection?
pawsh-magazine-dog-ear-infection-3If any or all of these symptoms are observed in your dog, it is recommended that you visit your regular vet as soon as possible for a proper diagnosis and treatment plan. Usually, ear infections are treated with specially prescribed medicated ear drops that need to be administered anywhere from once to three times daily for a week or two.

How to prevent a dog ear infection
pawsh-magazine-dog-ear-infection-4Some dogs are naturally prone to nutritional and environmental allergies, such as wheat or pollens, which make them more susceptible to ear irritations. However, according to vets, one of the leading causes of dog ear infections is excess moisture in the ear canal.

This excess moisture usually occurs after your dog has a bath or a swim. The extra moistness in your dog’s ear canal creates a prime breeding ground for bacteria to fester. So be sure to dry your dog’s ears well after water activities by covering your index finger with a dog towel and delicately drying the inside area.

Hair or fur in the ears can also contribute to excessive waxy build-up, so be sure to ask your groomer to trim the inside ear fur whenever you take Mr. Fluffypants in for a haircut.
pawsh-magazine-dog-ear-infection-9
{Huge thanks to my incredible friend and talented artist Tonya Pet Photography for photographing this special “Pet Wellness” column.}

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This article was made possible by DogTrot Fitness — Canada’s exclusive distributor of the PetRun line of dog treadmills — the ideal solution if your dog doesn’t love dog parks.
dog-treadmills-dogtrot-fitness-pawsh-magazineAdequate exercise is equally important to your dog’s wellness as a healthy diet. Even if you can’t run WITH your dog, we can help you meet his exercise needs, regardless of weather. With running decks scaled to suit any stride, there’s a PetRun treadmill for every size of dog!
WEBSITE | FACEBOOK | TWITTER

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DOG PARK ETIQUETTE: 6 KEY DOG PARK MANNERS

dog-park-manners-1 Dog parks are lively, bouncy environments that to the outside eye look chaotic, intense and perhaps even a little bit scary. Fortunately, however, they are more often than not very welcoming places — a friendly subculture of pet parenthood that allows dogs and their people to socialize and enjoy some rejuvenating fresh air.

Like any culture though there is a certain etiquette that comes with going to an off-leash dog park. Here are six important dog park manners to mind (assuming that your pupster already has great recall)…
dog-park-manners-2
1. KEEP CALM WHILE ON LEASH
Dogs sometimes like to great new arrivals to the park boisterously and will run up wildly to say hello. If this happens while you are arriving in the off-leash area and your dog is still on leash, keep calm to help your dog keep calm. This sort of greeting is completely different from a strange dog charging up to you on a street; although it may still be a bit nerve-wracking.

Do not yell, stiffen or try to shoo the greeters away. Allow all the dogs to sniff each other (that is their way of saying hi officially) and let your dog off to join in on the fun. Ideally you will want to let your dog off leash as soon as you pass an off-leash sign to avoid being in the middle of the park with lots of dogs running up while your dog is still not free.

If your dog is fearful of having other dogs run up to them both on and off leash, an off-leash dog park may not be the best environment for them. Consider instead a small doggie daycare group or dog-walker or go to your local dog park during less busy times of the day.

dog-park-manners-32. IT’S NOT ALL FUN & GAMES
While it is true that dogs will be dogs and play roughly with one another — they’ll chase around wildly, wrestle like there is no tomorrow and happily bark until they lose their voices — it isn’t always all fun and games at the park. Keep an eye on your dog’s body language and behaviour to avoid any undesirable incidents.

If your dog is being hounded relentlessly by another, despite trying to get away, growling or giving usual signs to back off, it is perhaps wise to intervene. Similarly, if your dog is the over-excited one who fails to recognize another’s signs to call it quits, direct them away to another area of the park.

Likewise if your dog is jumping all over other people or poking noisily around other people’s belongings, step in to correct their behaviour. Remember that a dog park is a public space and that you are responsible for your dog’s behaviour. Do not allow your dog to do whatever they please just because it is the dog park.dog-park-manners-4

3. STOOP & SCOOP
You may be outside in a large grassy field, but that doesn’t mean you should let your dog do their business just anywhere and then leave it be. Imagine how horrid dog parks would become if every four-legged visitor did that? Pe-eww! Keep a mindful eye on your pup as they frolic and bag their ‘doo.’ Forget your doggie bags? Just ask a fellow dog park visitor for one (or two so you’re covered on the walk home as well!)

4. NO SQUEAKING PLEASE
Lots of dogs like to play fetch at the park, so bringing balls and Frisbees is a lot of fun. Squeaky toys, however, are widely regarded as a dog park faux-pas. Squeaky toys are designed to speak to a dog’s natural hunting instincts and are very much loved by dogs of all shapes and sizes. Bringing such an item — a high-value item — to a raucous dog park can mean disaster. Dogs may fight over the squeaky toy, so air on the side of caution and leave the high-pitched noises at home.

dog-park-manners-5
5. DON’T TREAT BEFORE YOU SPEAK
Treats are a no-brainer at the dog park and practically every pet parent will have them tucked away in their pockets. But don’t treat a dog other than your own without their person’s permission. While you may want to spoil the adorable new fluffball at the park with lots of goodies, a lot of dogs have allergies or are on special diets. Or sometimes dogs are being trained without food and treating unexpectedly can disrupt their progress.

You wouldn’t want a total stranger giving your kid candy, would you? The same principle applies to kiddies of the four-legged variety. Similarly, don’t assume you can pick up any dog you like — even if they are a squishy puppy. Respect the dog’s space and presence as well as their person’s and always ask before you treat.

6. DON’T IGNORE YOUR DOG
Don’t be that person — the person who lets their dog off-leash and is then completely engrossed in their smart phone and oblivious to their dog’s whereabouts or antics. Your dog is your responsibility at the park. Make sure they are behaving in a dog polite manner (tip #2 above) and make sure you know where they are at all times so they don’t get lost.

Follow these tips and you’re dog will have a wonderful — and polite – park experience!

{Huge thanks to my incredible friend and talented artist Tonya Pet Photography for photographing this special “Pet Wellness” column.}

***

This article was made possible by DogTrot Fitness — Canada’s exclusive distributor of the PetRun line of dog treadmills — the ideal solution if your dog doesn’t love dog parks.
dog-treadmills-dogtrot-fitness-pawsh-magazineAdequate exercise is equally important to your dog’s wellness as a healthy diet. Even if you can’t run WITH your dog, we can help you meet his exercise needs, regardless of weather. With running decks scaled to suit any stride, there’s a PetRun treadmill for every size of dog!
WEBSITE | FACEBOOK | TWITTER

Save